Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences Banner

Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences

The Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences graduate sequence emphasizes study in basic research content areas (e.g., behavioral neuropsychology, conditioning, perception, learning, memory, psycholinguistics, and cognitive development) and the development of quantitative and methodological skills. The sequence focuses on three content areas: behavioral, neuroscience, and cognitive science, which provide a critical foundation for advanced graduate study and can facilitate entry into research-related careers in non-academic settings. The objectives of this sequence include building a solid foundation of basic psychological research, which will help students understand and explain behavior.

The master's degree can be completed with two years of full-time enrollment on campus.

University Admission Requirements

A student applying to a master's program must:

  • Have earned a four-year bachelor's degree or its equivalent from a college or university prior to fall admission
  • Send official transcripts from each college or university, other than Illinois State, where graduate, undergraduate, or non-degree credit was earned. Transcripts should be emailed from the school to Admissions@IllinoisState.edu or mailed in a sealed envelope to: Office of Admissions, Campus Box 2200, Normal, IL 61790-2200

International students can learn more about specific application requirements and deadlines by visiting the Office of Admissions.

Additional Program Admission Requirements

A student applying to this sequence must:

  • Submit a complete application by January 1
  • Have a cumulative 3.0 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) for either the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework or at least a 3.0 GPA for 9 hours of graduate coursework
  • Have completed at least 21 hours of undergraduate psychology courses that include general psychology, experimental psychology or research methods, and psychological statistics. Applicants should have a proficiency in math based on a passing grade in finite math or Precalculus (MAT 120 or 144 or equivalent), a grade of B or better in psychological statistics (PSY 340 or equivalent) or a score of 144 or higher on the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE General Test. Applicants who have not completed the required undergraduate courses may be admitted, but the missing course(s) will be added to the curriculum. Any missing courses must be completed during the first year of graduate study.

A complete application requires:

  • Official GRE General Test scores (use institution code 1319)
  • A curriculum vitae or resume that includes the following information, if applicable:
    • Any experiences (paid, unpaid, internship, volunteer, etc.) including dates, employer or organization, business addresses, and the nature of the experiences that are relevant to admission to this graduate sequence.
    • Any academic honors and awards including the year it was received and, if not evident from the title, briefly explain what the honor or award recognizes.
    • Any research experiences, skills, and accomplishments.
  • A writing sample (scholarly work approximately 5-15 pages long)
  • A personal statement (approximately 2-3 pages, double-spaced) that addresses the following:
    • Professional and career goals
    • Research interests and experiences
    • Qualifications for admission to this graduate sequence
    • How your interests and goals fit with this graduate sequence
  • Three recommendations (see application instructions about providing names and email addresses; recommendations must be uploaded to the application)

Applicant Interview Day: March 9, 2018 (Friday)

Some applicants may be invited to visit the department during the spring semester. The Applicant Interview Day schedule includes meeting with current graduate students and other invited applicants, interviews with faculty members, lunch, and a late afternoon social. Invited applicants will be contacted by the graduate coordinator.

Admission is offered only for the fall semester and is very competitive. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Admission offers are sent in March. The Council for Graduate Schools stipulates that an applicant has until April 15 to accept or decline an admission offer. Some admission offers may be delayed until applicants notify the department that they are declining admission.

Admission Dates and Deadlines

Term Application Deadline
Fall (August)  January 1 
Spring (January)  No spring admission 
Summer (May/June)  No summer admission 

Graduate Assistantship Information

The University provides graduate assistantships as a means of financial support. They are intended as a way to facilitate a student's progress to degree while providing important professional development.

Eligibility

To be eligible for an assistantship a student must, generally:

  • Be admitted as a degree-seeking student to a graduate program
  • Be in good-standing
  • Be enrolled full-time (typically at least 9 graduate credits) during the fall or spring semesters

Benefits

Graduate assistants receive:

  • Monthly wages paid in the form of either a stipend or an hourly wage
  • A waiver for 100% of tuition during a semester of appointment
  • A waiver for up to 12 credits of tuition for the summer term immediately following a fall or spring appointment

The department awards graduate assistantships to applicants who accept admission. Graduate assistantships are subject to verification of employment eligibility under U.S. immigration laws and the receipt of anticipated state funding by the University.

Cost & Funding

See Student Accounts for information on tuition and fees. Funding for graduate students is available from several different sources. Students who have been admitted from continuous states including Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, and Wisconsin will receive in-state tuition.

Graduate Coordinator

Name Office Email Phone
Alycia Hund  DeGarmo 430  amhund@ilstu.edu  (309) 438-7863 

Plan of Study

The master's degree curriculum focuses on basic research in Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences that provides critical foundation for advanced graduate study and can facilitate entry into research-related careers in non-academic settings. Students are encouraged to conduct their thesis work with Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences faculty members. Students may, however, complete a thesis with a faculty member outside of the sequence as long as the project is scientific in nature (i.e., involves quantitative measures and analyses). The master's degree can be completed in two years with full time enrollment.

Graduate Curriculum

The objective of this graduate sequence is to build a solid foundation of basic psychological principles that help students to understand and explain behavior. Students meet this objective through core courses in the behavioral, biological, and cognitive sciences. Students have opportunities to develop and expand upon their professional skills. This graduate sequence can be completed in two years of full-time enrollment. Students are required to take a minimum of 38 credits and complete a master's thesis. This graduate sequence is designed to be completed in two years. Below is a list of required courses for the sequence. The courses are for three credits unless otherwise noted.

Required Courses

  • PSY 400 Independent Study (1-4 credits; minimum 2 credits; BSC 400 may be substituted)
  • PSY 418 Learning and Cognition
  • PSY 427 Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences Pro-Seminar (1 credit; maximum total of 4 credits)
  • PSY 440 Statistics: Data Analysis and Methodology
  • PSY 441 Experimental Design
  • PSY 455 Cognitive Science
  • PSY 462 Experimental Analysis of Behavior
  • PSY 463 Brain and Behavior Relationships
  • PSY 480 Seminar in Psychology (1-12 credits; a minimum of 3 credits)
  • PSY 499 Master's Thesis (4-6 credits)
  • 2 Psychology elective courses (The selection of elective courses depends on the student's goals and interests.)

Sample Two-Year Plan of Study

Note: Enrollment in courses may be different each semester depending on faculty availability and the courses scheduled.

Year 1

FALL

  • PSY 418 Learning and Cognition
  • PSY 427 Proseminar (1 credit)
  • PSY 440 Statistics: Data Analysis and Methodology
  • PSY 480 Seminar in Psychology or elective
  • PSY 400 Independent Study (1-4 credits)

SPRING

  • PSY 427 Proseminar (1 credit)
  • PSY 441 Experimental Design
  • PSY 455 Cognitive Science
    or
    PSY 462 Experimental Analysis of Behavior
  • PSY 463 Brain and Behavior Relationships
  • PSY 400 Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Year 2

FALL

  • PSY 427 Proseminar (1 credit)
  • PSY 480 Seminar in Psychology or elective course
  • PSY 499 Master's Thesis (4-6 credits)
  • psychology elective course (3 credits)

SPRING

  • PSY 427 Proseminar (1 credit)
  • PSY 455 Cognitive Science
    or PSY 462 Experimental Analysis of Behavior
  • PSY 499 Master's Thesis (4-6 credits)

Cognitive & Behavioral Sciences Pro-Seminar

FALL 2017

Class meets on Fridays from 2-3 p.m. in 48 DeGarmo Hall.
Unable to attend Pro-Seminar: Students should send an email to Dr. Alycia Hund

Aug. 25 — Organizational Meeting

 

Sept. 1 — Discussion hour at Medici in Normal (112 North Street in Uptown Normal)

 

Sept. 8 — Invited Colloquium: Dr. Brian Day, Butler University, Examining the Effects of Altered Avatars on Perception-Action in Virtual Reality (colloquium flyer)

 

Sept. 15 — Overview of CBS sequence (first year students only)

 

Sept. 18 (Monday) — Invited Colloquium: Dr. Benoît Bardy, Professor, Health and Movement Science, and Director of EuroMov (a European center for research, technology and innovation in the movement sciences), University of Montpellier (France), What Your Moves Say About You: Action-Perception Dynamics and Mental Health (colloquium flyer)

Note: This colloquium is on Monday at 2 p.m. in 255 McCormick Hall; no Pro-Seminar on Friday, Sept. 22

 

Sept. 29 — Invited Colloquium: Dr. Haley Vlach, Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin Madison School of Education, "Learning to Forget, Forgetting to Learn: How Memory Shapes Cognitive Development, (colloquium flyer)

 

Oct. 6 — CBS Topic: Applying to Ph.D. programs and writing personnel statements

 

Oct. 13 — Article Discussion: Alex Dayer, "Is Consciousness Embodied?" by Jesse Prinz

 

Oct. 20 — Alumni Day Speakers, 2:00 p.m. in 551 DeGarmo Hall

    • Eric Wesselmann, M.A. 2005, Ph.D. 2011 (Purdue University), "Investigating DiverseTypes of Social Exclusion"
    • Christy England, M.S. 2000 Ph.D. 2006 (Educational Administration & Foundation, Illinois State), "The Value of a Degree in Psychology"

 

Oct. 27 — Research Colloquium: Dr. Dawn McBride

 

Nov. 3 — Research Colloquium: Dr. Valeri Farmer-Dougan and Jenny Gavin

 

Nov. 10 — Psychonomic Society 58th Annual Meeting (Thursday-Sunday), Vancouver, British Columbia; no Pro-Seminar this week

 

Nov. 17 — Research Colloquium: Dr. Paul Garris, Biological Sciences, "What determines abuse potential of psychostimulants?"

 

Nov. 24 — Thanksgiving break; no Pro-Seminar this week

 

Dec. 1 — First year Student Reports: Jenny Gavin and Jasmine Mason

 

Dec. 8 — First year Student Report: Piper Rogers

 

 

Cognitive & Behavioral Sciences Pro-Seminar Archive

2016-17

FALL 2016

CBS Topics

  • Organizational Meeting;
  • The CBS sequence, Degree Audit, and How to write a thesis
  • How to construct your curriculum vitae
  • Applying to Ph.D. programs, and writing personal statements
  • Peer Reviews

 

Student Presentation: Rachel Workman

 

First Year Student Reports: Olivia Cody and Sarah Caputo, Olivia Cody, and Rachel VonderHaar

 

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Mita Puri, Dr. Jeff Wagman

 

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Drew Abney, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, The Complexity Matching Hypothesis for Human Communication
  • Dr. Gregory Simpson, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, The Persistence of Processing Prospective Context Effects in Visual Word Recognitions; Guest of the Institute for Prospective Cognition
  • Dr. Michael Torry, Illinois State, School of Kinesiology and Recreation, Biomechanics: Relating Human Function to Physiological Structure

 

SPRING 2017

Class meets on Fridays from 2-3 p.m. in 48 DeGarmo Hall.

Jan. 20 — Organizational Meeting and 3MT (3 Minute Thesis)

 

Jan. 27 — CBS Topic: Visiting Ph.D. Programs

 

Feb. 3 — Article Discussion: Olivia Cody, How we make sense of time. Cooperrider & Núñez (2016)

 

Feb. 10 — Faculty Presentation: Dr. Alycia Hund, GIS

 

Feb. 17 — Student Presentation: Vince Cialdella

 

Feb. 24 — Student Presentation: Matt Langley

 

Mar. 3 — Student Presentation: Alex Dayer

 

Mar. 10 — No meeting; Applicant Interview Day (schedule: 11:30 a.m. lunch, afternoon meetings until 4:00 p.m., 4-6 p.m. optional student social)

 

Mar. 17 — No meeting due to spring break

 

Mar. 24 — Faculty Presentation: Dr. Jeff Wagman, "Communicating your research findings to laypeople: Don't be such a scientist."

 

Mar. 31 — No meeting due to University Research Symposium

 

Apr. 7 — Dr. Joshua M. Gulley, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Topic: Imbalances in brain maturation and their role in adolescent-typical behavior and the consequences of amphetamine abuse. Download the flyer.

 

Apr. 14 — Dr. Chris Pagano, Clemson University, Perceiving Haptic Distance-To-Break in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task. Download the flyer.

 

Apr. 21 —Dana Karraker, Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology

 

Apr. 28 — Janis Swanton, ISU Research and Sponsored Programs, Topic: Grants

 

May 5 — Article Discussion by Olivia Cody: A manifesto for reproducible science. Munafò, Nosek, Bishop, Button, Chambers, et al. (2017)

 

2015-16

FALL 2015

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis; How to construct your curriculum vitae; Applying to Ph.D. programs

 

Student Presentations: Vince Cialdella, Alex Dayer, Matt Langley, Valerie Rodriquez, Tatsu Shigeta, and Rachel Workman

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Steve Croker, Dr. Dawn McBride, and Dr. Corinne Zimmerman

Alumni Day Guest Speaker: Early Career Award Recipient Dr. Jennifer Coane, Colby College, Casting Nets through Memory: Capturing the Richness of Semantic Knowledge

 

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Daniel Casasanto, University of Chicago, How the Body Shapes Emotion in Brain and Behavior
  • Dr. Carly Leonard, University of California, Davis, Mechanisms of Attention and Their Relationship to Impairments in People with Schizophrenia
  • Dr. James Nairne, Purdue University, Adaptive Memory: Is the Evolutionary Account Still Viable?
  • Dr. Vanessa Simmering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Exploring the Link Between Language and Spatial Skills

 

SPRING 2016

CBS Topic: Visiting PhD programs

Student Presentations: Joey Bai, Kassandra Lee, Emilio Lobato, and Daniel Schloesser

Institute for Prospective Cognition Guest Speaker: Dr. Brian McCuskey, Utah State University, Sherlock Holmes: Virtual Reality Goes Viral

Guest Speakers: 

  • Dr. Ellen Furlong, Illinois Wesleyan University, Comparative Cognition: What Animals Can Teach Us About Our Minds
  • Dr. Jean Pretz, Elizabethtown College, Use if Intuition and Analysis in Clinical Decision Making in Nursing
  • Dr. David Rosenbaum, Pennsylvania State University, The Cinderella of Psychology

2014-15

FALL 2014

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis; How to construct your curriculum vitae; Applying to Ph.D. programs

 

Student Presentations: Joey Bai, Amanda Hubbard, Kassandra Lee, Emilio Lobato, Daniel Schloesser, and Tatsu Shigeta

 

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Thomas Critchfield, Dr. Amrita Puri, and Dr. Jeff Wagman

 

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Jeff Karpicke, Purdue University, Retrieval-Based Learning: Active Retrieval Promotes Long-Lasting Learning
  • Brandon Thomas, University of Cincinnati, Remembered Affordances: A Novel Perspective on the Nature of Affordance Perception

 

SPRING 2015

 

CBS Topic: Visiting Ph.D. programs

 

Student Presentations: Jennifer Brown, Angela Conte, Amanda Hubbard, and Michael Nehlsen,

 

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Claudia Carello, University of Connecticut, Mutuality in the Perception of Affordances and the Control of Movement
  • Dr. Laura Colgin, University of Texas at Austin, Place Cell Coding During Slow and Fast Gamma Oscillations
  • Dr. Damian Kelty-Stephen, Grinnell College, When the "Ceteris" Aren't so "Paribus": Individual Differences in Cognitive Performance and the Full-Body, Multiscaled Imbalances that Participants Lay at Our Laboratory Doorsteps
  • Dr. Lana Kuhle, Illinois State's Department of Philosophy, Perception Beyond Object Perception - A Case for Expanding our Standard Account of Perception in Bodily Awareness
  • Dr. Gary Raney, University of Illinois at Chicago, Can Reading About Gravity Help You Understand Cats? Transfer Benefits Across Seemingly Unrelated Texts
  • Dr. Tom Stoffregen, University of Minnesota, Exploratory Movement in Affordance Perception, or the Kinesiology of Epistemology
  • Dr. Michael Turvey, University of Connecticut, The Theory of Perception-Action for All Organisms: What Kind of Science Does It Entail?
  • David Vinson, M.S., University of California, Merced, Language Use Under Social and Cognitive Constraints

 

2013-14

FALL 2013

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis; Applying to doctoral programs

Student Presentations: Jennifer Brown, Rebecca Campbell, Angela Conte, Brian Day, Alina Efanov, Amanda Hubbard, Michael Nehlsen, and Daniel Nuccio

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Jennifer Coane, Colby College, Activation Processes and their Role in False Memory
  • Dr. Ehtibar Dzhafarov, Purdue University, Measuring Context and Determinism in Behavioral, Biological, and Physical Systems
  • Dr. James Nairne, Purdue University, Adaptive Memory: Evolutionary Influences on Remembering
  • Dr. Maggie Renken, Georgia State University, Unpacking Epistemic Cognition: What are the Sources of Students' Science Knowledge?
  • Dr. Peter Smith, Illinois State, Department of Kinesiology & Recreation, Moderators of Attentional Focus Effects on Performing and Learning Motor Skills

 

SPRING 2014

 

CBS Topic: PhD. programs and getting a job

 

Student Presentations: Angela Conte, Brian Day, Devin Gill, Amanda Hubbard, and Daniel Nuccio

 

Faculty Pres net at ion: Dr. Scott Jordan

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Tony Chemero, University of Cincinnati-McMicken College of Arts and Sciences, Brown Bag: The Human-Environment System
  • Dr. Robert Goldstone, Indiana University, Being Part of Something Bigger Than Us: The Patterns That Human Groups Spontaneously Create

 

2012-13

FALL 2012

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis; Applying to doctorate programs

Student Presentations: Jennifer Brown, Brian Day, Devin Gill, Jacob Foulks, Samantha Petrella, and Doug Schuweiler

Faculty Presentations: Dr Dawn McBride, and Dr. Jeff Wagman

Institute for Prospective Cognition Guest Speaker: Dr. Michael Spivey, University of California, Merced, Synchrony and Coordination in Human Interaction

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Angela Grippo, Northern Illinois University, Depression and Heart Disease: Investigating Biopsychosocial Mechanisms Using Animal Models
  • Dr. Mark McDaniel, Washington University, Importing Memory Principles to Education: Improving Learning and Retention
  • Dr. Jon Pettibone, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Exploring the Construction of Preference Using Traditional and Dynamic Connectionist Models of Decision Making
  • Dr. Larissa Samuelson, University of Iowa, Grounding Word Learning in Space and Time

 

SPRING 2013

 

CBS Topic: Applying to and visiting Ph.D. programs

Student Presentations: Devin Gill, Samantha Petrella, and Daniel Nuccio

Institute for Prospective Cognition Guest Speaker: Dr. Shawn Green, University of Wisconsin, Brains Raised on Video Games: Where Are We Headed?

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Jim Clinton, Northern Illinois University, Some Folks Call it the Kuleshov Effect: Engendering Emotions in Narrative Film
  • Dr. Rebecca Davis, Grand Valley State University. Wayfinding in Aging: The Effects of Colorful and Familiar Cues

 

2011-12

FALL 2011

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis; Applying to doctoral programs; How to construct a curriculum vitae

 

Student Presentations: Drew Abney, Devin Gill, Daniel Nuccio, Erica Ranade, and David Vinson

 

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Valeri Farmer-Dougan, and Dr. Scott Jordan

 

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Dave Gallo, University of Chicago, Quality Trumps Quantity in Episodic Memory Monitoring
  • Dr. Jay Holden, University of Cincinnati, The Self: Organizing Dynamics of Cognitive Performance
  • Dr. Matthew Hunsinger, Mary Baldwin College, The Benefits of Meditation for the Self and Other
  • Dr. Shaun Vecera, University of Iowa, Control of Visual Attention: Capture, Complexity, and Contingencies

 

SPRING 2012

 

CBS Topic: Preparing for doctoral interviews

Student Presentations: Drew Abney, Andrew Baker, Douglas Schuweiler, Brandon Thomas, and David Vinson

Institute for Prospective Cognition Guest Speaker: Dr. Takahiro Higuchi, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Prospective Control of Locomotion

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. John Kostelnick, Illinois State's Department of Geology-Geography, Perceptual and Cognitive Issues in Mapmaking
  • Dr. Derek D. Reed, University of Kansas, Paradoxical Preferences: Discounting the Value of Abundance
  • Dr. Jeffrey Zacks, Washington University, Event Perception, Cognitive Control, and Memory

2010-11

FALL 2010

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis

 

Student Presentations: Drew Abney, Andrew Baker, Jim Clinton, Andrew Kenning, Doug Schuweiler, Brandon Thomas, and David Vinson

 

Faculty Presentation: Dr. Corinne Zimmerman

 

Alumni Day Guest Speakers:

 

  • Alumna of the Year Award Recipient Dr. Kathleen Bieschke, Penn State University, Trainee Competence to Work with Sexual Minority Clients: The Role of Affirmation
  • Early Career Award Recipient Dr. Michael Olson, University of Tennessee: Implicit Attitudes: Origins and Consequences

 

Institute for Prospective Cognition Guest Speaker: Noah Earle, The Troubadour and the Triangle: The Evolution of Artistic Expression as a Corollary to Shifts in Identity

 

Guest Speaker:

 

  • Dr. Charles Coey, University of Cincinnati
  • Dr. Joseph Magliano, Norther Illinois University, Why Does Continuity Editing in FilmWork So Well?: A Neuro-cognitive Explanation
  • Dr. Jay Smart, Miami University, You Be the Judge: Perceptual Quantification of Postural Motion
  • Dr. David Uttal, Northwestern University, Making the Case for Space: Why Spatial Cognition Matters in STEM Learning

 

SPRING 2011

 

CBS Topic: Tips for preparing a course lecture

Student Presentations: Drew Abney, Andrew Baker, Justin Durtschi, Ankit Patel, Matthew Richardson, Brandon Thomas, and David Vinson

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Kona Jones, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Richland Community College, Best Practices in Distance Education: Determining the Effectiveness of a Mandatory Online Student Orientation
  • Dr. Brad Morris, Grand Valley State University, Am I Right or Am I Wrong? Inconsistency Detection Jump Starts Knowledge Change
  • Dr. Mike Richardson, University of Cincinnati, Recent Developments in the Dynamics of Movement Interference and Group Synchrony
  • Dr. Chris Wahlheim, Washington University, Retrieval Processes: Natural Concept Learning, Proactive Effects of Memory, and Remindings

 

2009-10

FALL 2009

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; How to write a thesis

 

Student Presentations: Jim Clinton, Justin Durtschi, Andrew Kenning, Eric Nelson, Amanda Padgitt, Ankit Patel, Matthew Richardson, and Lynn Spotts

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Tom Critchfield, Dr. Steve Croker, Dr. Scott Jordan, and Dr. Jeff Wagman

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Harald Atmanspacher, C. G. Jung Institute, Zurich, Relative Onticity and Contextual Emergence
  • Dr. Nicole Gage, University of California, Irvine, Tuning In and Tuning Out: MEG Measures of Neural Resource Allocation for Speech and Nonspeech in Auditory Language Cortex in Typically Developing Children
  • Dr. Jacqueline Nadel, University Pierre and Marie Curie, Pitié-Salpétrière, France, Where Do You End and I Begin? The Social Nature of a Developing Mind
  • Dr. Jim Nairne, Purdue University, Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Enhances Retention
  • Dr. Michael Riley, University of Cincinnati, Coordination as the Soft-Assembly of Action Systems: Lessons from Postural Sway Dynamics
  • Dr. Jessica Witt, Purdue University, Seeing into the Future: How Anticipated Action Influences Spatial Perception

 

SPRING 2010

 

CBS Topic: Constructing a curriculum vitae

Student Presentations: Jim Clinton, Justin Jonathan Davis, Durtschi, Antik Patel, Matthew Richardson, Lynn Spotts, and Kelly Wystarczyk

Faculty Presentation: Dr. Corinne Zimmerman

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Robert Bishop, Wheaton College, On the Contextually-Emergent Nature of Meaningful Action
  • Dr. Tomie Hahn, Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Sensational Knowledge: Transmission and Entrainment
  • Dr. William Klipec, Drake University, The Rat P300 ERP is a Correlate of Recognizing the Conditioned Reinforcing and Informational Properties of Stimuli

 

2008-09

FALL 2008

CBS Topics: The CBS sequence; Applying to PhD programs; Completing a thesis; IRB and IACUC procedures

 

Faculty Presentation: Dr. Thomas Critchfield

 

Alumni Day Guest Speaker: Alumnus of the Year Award Recipient Dr. Kristofer Hagglund, Associate Dean of the School of Health Professions, University of Missouri, Psychology and Public Health are Twin Disciplines

 

Guest Speakers:

 

  • Dr. Steve Croker, University of Derby, England
  • Dr. Iring Koch, Institute of Psychology, RWTH Aachen University, Germany, Task Switching
  • Dr. Berry Raulerson, University of Southern Indiana, Measuring Working Memory Capacity Using Repetition Priming of Words
  • Dr. Matthew Schlesinger, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, The Neural Basis for Visual Selective Attention in Young Infants
  • Dr. Cees van Leeuwen, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Tokyo, Japan, Symmetry and Regularity Perception in Non-letter and Letter Shapes and What its Implications for Difficulties in Learning to Read
  • Dr. Alexander Varakin, Knox College, Remembering the Unseen and Forgetting the Scene

 

SPRING 2009

 

Student Presentations: Charles Coey, and Kate Hudson

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Jim Blascovich, University of California, Santa Barbara, Products of Consciousness: Is Reality Always Virtual?
  • Dr. Daniel Corts, Augustana College
  • Dr. Guy van Orden, University of Cincinnati, Self-Organization of Cognitive Performance

 

2007-08

FALL 2007

No information available

 

SPRING 2008

Student Presentations: Ramya Chandrashekar, Elizabeth Dalianis, Katie Hudson, Poonam Joshi, Chris Sorric, Stephanie Stillings, and Leslie Wise

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Jodie Plumert, University of Iowa, How Do Immature Perceptual and Cognitive Skills Put Child Cyclists At-risk for Injury?
  • Dr. Brad Sheese, Illinois Wesleyan University, Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Early Cognitive Development
  • Dr. Kevin Shockley, University of Cincinnati, Multimodal Specification and Perceptual Equivalence: Foray into the Global Array
  • Dr. Gottfried Süssenbacher, Institut für Psychologie der Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt (Austria), "Phylogentic" Amnesia: Precondition or Self-Consciousness?

2006-07

FALL 2006

CBS Topics: Completing your master's degree; The master's thesis process; Applying to Ph.D. programs; IRB Procedures

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Cooper Cutting, Dr. Valeri Farmer-Dougan, and Dr. Scott Jordan

Guest Speakers:

  • Jennifer Coane, Colby College, An Exploration of Orthographic and Phonological Influences in Visual Word Recognition
  • Dr. James St. James, Millikin University, The Intuitive Physics of Levers and the Detection of Fraud in Claims of Back Injury
  • Dr. Jim Narine, Purdue University
  • Dr. John Spencer, Re-thinking Thought: The Dynamic Field Theory and the Dynamics of Visuo-Spatial Cognition
  • Dr. Diana Walker, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, The Psychopharmacology of Inhaled Anesthetics as a Model of Inhalant Abuse

 

SPRING 2007

 

Student Presentations: Charles Coey, Rebecca Georgis, Kate Hudson, Poonam Joshi, Tom Morrison, Brian Seanor, Chris Sorric, and Stephanie Stilling

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Tony Chemero, Franklin & Marshall College, Radical Embodied Cognitive Science
  • Dr. Tony Regio-Carte
  • Dr. Frances Wang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Human Navigation and Nestled Environments
  • Dr. Joe Williams, Illinois Wesleyan University

2005-06

FALL 2005

CBS Topics: The master's degree; Applying to Ph.D. programs; The thesis proposal; IRB and IACUC procedures

 

Honors Students Research Presentations:

 

  • Alicia Pachla: Spatial Working Memory in Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Summer Scott: Effect of Grammatical Class on Semantic and Phonological Mediated Priming Using Homophone Triplets

 

Faculty Research: Dr. Alycia Hund, What counts as 'by': Young children's use of relative distance to judge nearbyness

Guest speakers:

  • Dr. Mark Dixon, Southern Illinois University, Near-Miss Effects on Response Latencies and Win Estimations of Slot Machine Players
  • Dr. Art Krammer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Dr. Joe Magliano, Northern Illinois University Generating Predictive Inferences While Viewing a Movie
  • Dr. James Nairne, Purdue University
  • Dr. Jim Zacny, University of Chicago; Drug Dependency on Prescription Opiod Non-medical Use and Abuse

 

SPRING 2006

 

CBS Topics: Applying to graduate school; Grant writing; Post-master's degree employment

 

Student Research Colloquia: Matthew Hunsinger, Berry Raulerson, and Kona Taylor

Guest Speakers:

  • Mr. Marcello Ghin, University of Paderborn, Germany
  • Dr. Morton A. Heller, Eastern Illinois University, Touch and Blindness
  • Dr. Jason S. McCarley, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Human Performance in Baggage X-ray Screening: Attention, Perception, Metacognition
  • Dr. Jean Pretz, Illinois Wesleyan University
  • Dr. Amy Shelton, Johns Hopkins University, Spatial Perspective

 

2004-05

FALL 2004

CBS Topics: The master's degree; Writing a thesis; IRB procedures

Student Presentations: Matthew Hunsinger, Kona Taylor, and Chris Wahlheim

Faculty Presentation: Dr. Thomas Critchfield

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Aaron Benjamin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, False Memories
  • Dr. Dave Fraser, Northwestern University, Serial Spatial Working Memory: Connecting Thought to Action
  • Dr. Amy Shelton, Johns Hopkins University, Cognitive Maps of Everyday Space: How Encoding Affects Representation

 

SPRING 2005

 

CBS Topics: Applying to graduate school; Grant writing; Post-master's degree employment

 

Student Research Colloquia: Matthew Hunsinger, Berry Raulerson, and Kona Taylor

Guest Speakers:

  • Mr. Marcello Ghin, University of Paderborn, Germany
  • Dr. Morton A. Heller, Eastern Illinois University, Touch and Blindness
  • Dr. Jason S. McCarley, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Human Performance in Baggage X-ray Screening: Attention, Perception, Metacognition
  • Dr. Jean Pretz, Illinois Wesleyan University
  • Dr. Amy Shelton, Johns Hopkins University, Spatial Perspective

 

2003-04

FALL 2003

CBS Topics: The CBS master's degree; The IRB process

 

Student Presentations: Jennifer Coane and Tim Hubbard

 

Faculty Presentations: Dr. Thomas Critchfield, Dr. Cooper Cutting, Dr. Val Farmer-Dougan, Dr. Byron Heidenreich, Dr. Alycia Hund, Dr. Jeff Wagman, and Dr. Corinne Zimmerman

Guest Speaker: Dr. Alex Kirlik, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Ecological Modeling of Judgment under Uncertainty

SPRING 2004

 

CBS Topic : The thesis process

Student Presentations: Amy Attivissimo, Jori Colbert, Matthew Hunsinger, Berry Raulerson, Kona Taylor, and Nikki Temple

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Boris Kotchoubey, University of Tubingen, Germany, ERPs and Cortical Anticipation
  • Dr. Gary Raney, University of Illinois-Chicago, Text Comprehension
  • Dr. Katja Wiemer-Hastings, Northern Illinois University, Abstract Concepts: Closing in on a Challenge

 

Dual Sequence

Students admitted into a master's sequence in Psychology (Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Developmental Psychology, Industrial/Organizational-Social Psychology, or Quantitative Psychology) may complete coursework for a second (“dual”) sequence.

Application Process

Students should complete the DUAL SEQUENCE APPLICATION. The application is an interactive Microsoft Word document. The student should open the application and complete it on a computer. The student should print, sign, and date the application and submit the signed application to the sequence coordinator by October 15. The sequence coordinator may write a letter of support for the student's application. The second sequence coordinator should receive the application and letter of support, if applicable, from the sequence coordinator by November 1.

Approval Process

The faculty members of the second sequence review the application and determine if the second sequence is appropriate based on the student's goals, qualifications, and the second sequence's resources (e.g., space limitation, faculty availability, etc.). After a decision is reached, the second sequence coordinator approves or denies the dual sequence application. The second sequence coordinator completes the lower portion of the application and submits it to the Graduate Programs Office for processing.

Recording the Second Sequence

If the second sequence coordinator approves the application, the Graduate Programs Office updates the student's graduate record in Campus Solutions. The Graduate Programs Office notifies the student and both sequence coordinators when the student's graduate record includes the second sequence.

Graduation

After completing all degree requirements, the University confers a master's degree in Psychology will a concentration that identifies both sequences.

Thesis Procedures

Graduate students must complete a thesis in order to satisfy graduation requirements for a master's degree. Students must complete all of the degree requirements, including the thesis, in six years beginning with the first semester of enrollment. Students are responsible for reviewing and complying with the department's Thesis Procedures, which are explained below.

Students should also review the Thesis section in the Graduate Catalog and the Graduate School's Academic (Thesis Assistance) website for additional information about the University's thesis policies, continuous enrollment, graduation deadlines, etc. A thesis:

  • Should have a theoretical framework as its conceptual base
  • May represent a test or prediction derived from a theory, or an extension of an existing group of studies
  • May replicate an existing study, provided it attempts to repeat the study with some meaningful variation
  • May be reports of surveys related to themes of professional interest (see American Psychologist)
  • May have as a goal the development or improvement of instrumentation (see Behavior Research Methods)
  • May be ethological or statistical in nature, originating a new design, improving an existing design, or reapplying a quantitative statistical technique (see Journal of Mathematical Psychology and Educational and Psychological Measurement)
  • May be theoretical in nature providing an exposition of constructs, assumptions, interactions among constructs, translation into empirical variables, or illustrations of applications (see Psychological Bulletin and Psychological Review)
  • Must investigate a real problem (i.e., if the answer is obvious based on existing literature, the thesis poses a non-problem). However, research may be conducted to solve a practical problem, provided the solution can be generalized.

Thesis Standards

A thesis should be written in the professional style of a journal article, except for the rare thesis that is non-empirical in nature. The thesis chapters are usually identified as: Introduction, Method, Results, and Discussion. Graduate students are required to comply with the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition, 2010) and with the University's thesis policies, which are available on the Graduate School's Academic (Thesis Assistance) website.

The Graduate School's thesis policies covers the administrative aspects and appearance of a thesis. The APA's Publication Manual governs the professional format and style of a thesis. There are subtle differences between the Graduate School's thesis policies and the department's Thesis Procedures. Students are expected to comply with the department's Thesis Procedures to successfully complete their theses. Students must also follow the standards of the APA's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct when conducting research.

Important Deadlines

Students are encouraged to review the  Dates and Deadlines on the Graduate School's Graduation and Commencement website for specific deadlines related thesis procedures including the last day for: submitting a Proposal Approval Form, submitting a Right to Defend request, and for a thesis defense. If these deadlines are not met, graduation will be postponed until the following semester.

Forming a Committee

During the first semester of graduate study, students should review the  Faculty Research Interests website, as a resource for potential research topics. Students should talk to faculty members who are knowledgeable or who are willing to become familiar in the area in which students would like to complete their thesis research. Students need to solicit faculty members to serve as the thesis committee chair and on the thesis committee.

By the middle of the second semester of their first year, students should solicit one faculty member to serve as the thesis committee chair. Graduate School thesis policies require the committee chair be a full member of the Graduate Faculty. An associate member of the Graduate Faculty may serve as a committee co-chair, along with a full member of the Graduate Faculty.

When a faculty member agrees to serve as a committee chair (or two faculty members as co-chairs), students must complete the DEPARMENT APPROVAL OF THESIS COMMITTEE CHAIR form. The Committee Chair form also includes an override request for PSY 499 Master's Thesis. The Committee Chair form should be signed by the student, committee chair, and the program or sequence graduate coordinator. The signed Committee Chair form should be submitted to the Graduate Programs Office. Students cannot register for PSY 499 until the signed Committee Chair form has been received by the Graduate Programs Office and the override request has been processed. Students will be notified, by the Graduate Programs Office, when they can register for PSY 499.

In consultation with their thesis committee chair, students should solicit a second faculty member for the committee. After the second faculty member agrees to serve on the committee, students must complete the DEPARTMENT APPROVAL OF THESIS COMMITTEE form. The Committee form should be signed by the student, committee chair, and faculty member. The signed Committee form must be submitted to the Graduate Programs Office for approval by the department chair. If there are committee co-chairs, students and their co-chairs may decide not to solicit another faculty member for the thesis committee, provided both co-chairs are full member's of the Graduate Faculty. Graduate School thesis policies require the majority of the thesis committee (i.e., chair and members) to be full members of the Graduate Faculty. If one co-chair is an associate member of the Graduate Faculty, another faculty member, who is a full member of the Graduate Faculty, must be solicited for the thesis committee.

If a committee member is unable to complete his or her service or is willing to yield his or her position on the committee, students should consult with their thesis committee chair about soliciting a new faculty member for the committee. Students must complete the CHANGE OF THESIS COMMITTEE and/or TOPIC form. The Change form should be signed by the student, committee chair(s), current committee member, and new faculty member. The signed Change form must be submitted to the Graduate Programs Office for approval by the department chair. Students will be notified if the faculty member has been approved as the new thesis committee member. If the thesis has been proposed and approved by the thesis committee, students must also complete the Graduate School's COMMITTEE CHANGE FORM, which is available on the Graduate School's Academics (Forms) website.

Writing a Proposal

Graduate students must write a proposal that will be evaluated by their thesis committee. Students should discuss the contents of the proposal with their committee chair. The committee chair determines how much guidance will be provided to students in the development of the hypothesis, research project, and proposal. There should be a clear understanding between students and their committee chair of what is expected from each party.

The proposal should include a brief synopsis of the thesis topic and hypothesis, and the details of the research project. A thesis usually involves data collection; however, other data-based approaches are acceptable (e.g., meta-analyses, archival data sets, etc.). The proposal should address the use of human participants or animals in the research, if applicable. The proposal should also identify any ethical issues with the use of human participants or animals. Students should be diligent in the completeness of their thesis topic and research project. The committee chair should approve a draft of the proposal before it is submitted to the thesis committee.

Students should review the information on the department's Tools and Links for Researchers website in preparation for their thesis research. Before conducting any research involving human participants, the student's research project must be approved by Illinois State's Institutional Review Board (IRB). The proposal must include, in its method section, a detailed explanation of how the ethical issues will be addressed (e.g., possible risks to human participants, how such risks will be minimized, confidentiality procedures, informed consent, debriefing procedures, etc.). Students must also comply with the department's Ethical Guidelines and Procedures for Research Using Human Participants. If students anticipate using human participants from external sources (outside the University), the proposal must include a statement of the ethical procedures of the external source, and how the research project will conform to those requirements. The department recommends students obtain a signed agreement or memorandum of understanding, from the external source, that identifies the specific data students have permission to collect and use for their research project.

Before conducting any research involving the use of animals, the student's research project must be approved by Illinois State's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). The proposal must include, in its method section, a detailed explanation of how the ethical requirements for the care and use of animals will comply with the IACUC procedures.

Scheduling a Proposal

Graduate students must propose their thesis in a public forum. Before presenting a proposal, students must determine if the proposal contains any copyrighted material. Students should review and complete page 2 of the Graduate School's PROPOSAL APPROVAL FORM, which is available on the Graduate School's Academic (Forms) website. If any box under section (5) Copyright Checklist is checked for copyrighted material, students must consult with the Copyright Officer and obtain the Copyright Officer's signature on the Proposal Approval Form.

After consulting with the committee chair about proposing the thesis, students must contact the Graduate Programs Office to request a reader. The reader, who is a psychology faculty member, is appointed by the department. The reader represents the department and ensures that students and their thesis committees comply with the department's procedures and the University's requirements. The Graduate Programs Office will notify students when a reader has been assigned.

The proposal must be presented at a time that is mutually agreeable to the student, thesis committee, and reader. The proposal must be presented between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, while classes are in session (i.e., excluding University holidays, final exams week, or semester breaks). When an acceptable time has been determined, students should contact the Graduate Programs Office to reserve a room. The Graduate Programs Office will notify the student when a room has been reserved.

When the proposal date has been determined, students must complete the information on page 3 of the Proposal Approval Form. Only the thesis committee should be identified on the Proposal Approval Form, along with their department/school and Graduate Faculty status. Students should contact the Graduate Programs Office at psygrad@ilstu.edu to determine the Graduate Faculty status for the thesis committee. The reader is not identified on the Proposal Approval Form. If the thesis committee does not satisfy the Graduate School's thesis committee requirements (described on page 1 of the Proposal Approval Form), the exception section on page 3, under section (6) Graduate Committee Information, must be completed. A brief rationale must be provided for the exception. If a committee member is not an Illinois State faculty member, students must also include the committee member's curriculum vitae, with the Proposal Approval Form, to satisfy the exception requirement.

At least one week before the scheduled proposal date, students must submit, by 12:00 p.m. (Noon), the Proposal Approval Form and a printed copy of their proposal to the Graduate Programs OfficeStudents must also provide a copy of the proposal to the thesis committee and reader; the copy may be printed or sent electronically, depending on the preferences of the committee members or reader. The Graduate Programs Office will announce the scheduled proposal on the department's graduate students and faculty email listserv, and will post the information on the University Events website and on the bulletin board across from the department's office.

Presenting a Thesis Proposal

The department encourages psychology graduate students to attend thesis proposals in order to observe the process. The proposal is also open to the University academic community. Students should consult with their thesis committee chair if students would like to invite non-academic parties (i.e., family and friends) to the proposal. Individuals observing the proposal may ask the student questions and provide comments about the presentation. However, participation by such individuals should not monopolize the presentation. Since the proposal is a formal evaluation of the student, the thesis committee chair has the discretion of whether or not to recognize individuals for questions or comments during the presentation. The department prohibits any refreshments at a thesis proposal.

At the proposal, students should discuss their thesis and any relevant literature, and explain their research project. When the presentation has ended and there are no more questions, everyone should leave the room except for the thesis committee, reader, and any other psychology faculty members. The committee will discuss the proposal. Psychology faculty who have an opinion about the proposal are encouraged to present their remarks for consideration by the thesis committee. The decision to approve or withhold approval of the thesis proposal is the responsibility of the thesis committee. The committee must reach a consensus about the status of the proposal. When a consensus is reached, the student will be asked to return to the room and will be informed of the committee's decision.

If the proposal is approved, the thesis committee and the student should sign the Proposal Approval Form. If the committee determines that changes are required in the thesis, the committee should discuss the changes with the student. The committee chair should give the student a written list of the required changes. Students are responsible for incorporating the changes in the thesis and must provide the thesis committee and reader with an updated proposal. When the thesis committee is satisfied with the revised thesis proposal, the thesis committee and the student should sign the Proposal Approval Form. The student must submit the signed Proposal Approval Form to the Graduate Programs Office, for approval by the department chair.

The Graduate School must also approve the Proposal Approval Form. The Graduate Programs Office cannot submit the signed Proposal Approval Form to the Graduate School until a Protocol number, if applicable, has been recorded in section (4) Compliance Requirements on page 2 of the Proposal Approval Form. If the Protocol number is not available when the Proposal Approval Form is signed, the Graduate Programs Office will retain the signed Form. Students must notify the Graduate Programs Office when a protocol number has been assigned to their thesis research. The Graduate Programs Office will record the Protocol number on the Proposal Approval Form and will submit the signed Form to the Graduate School. Students will be notified by email when the Graduate School approves the Proposal Approval Form. The email will also include a copy of the Proposal Approval Form signed by the Graduate School. The approved Proposal Approval Form should be retained by the student; the information on the Proposal Approval Form will be required by the Graduate School when the student is ready to defend the thesis.

If the thesis committee does not approve the proposal, students have two options:

  1. Students may choose, with the agreement of their committee, to rewrite the proposal. The thesis committee and student should discuss the problems with the current proposal. The second proposal must address and correct the identified problems. Students must schedule a second proposal presentation. This option requires students retain the same thesis committee.
  2. Students may chose to develop a new thesis topic. If this option is selected, students may retain their thesis committee, if the committee members agree to stay with the thesis committee, or solicit other faculty members for a new committee. The department's thesis procedures must be repeated, including the forms for a new committee, if applicable, and proposal presentation.
 

Establishing a ProQuest Account

The University uses a national electronic database, ProQuest, for submission of all theses. The department recommends students establish a ProQuest account after their proposal has been approved. Students can access the ProQuest website on the Graduate School's Thesis Assistance (Plan Your Defense) website.  The approved proposal should be uploaded to ProQuest. If the ProQuest account is not established after the thesis proposal is approved, it must be established before students submit the Right to Defend form to the Graduate School.

Continuous Enrollment in PSY 499

Students should review Continuous Registration requirements in the Thesis section of the Graduate Catalog. After the proposal is approved and all degree coursework has been completed, students must enroll for at least one credit of PSY 499 every fall and spring semester until the thesis is successfully defended. Registration for PSY 499 in the summer is required only when a student expects to defend the thesis and complete the degree by the end of the summer semester. Students should contact the Graduate Programs Office at psygrad@ilstu.edu to request an override for PSY 499.

Conducting Thesis Research

After the proposal is approved, students should begin conducting their thesis research. While it is appropriate to consult with faculty members, students are expected to conceptually understand the statistics and data analysis that is presented in the thesis. Any significant changes to the research project, after the proposal has been approved, may require additional IRB or IACUC review and approval, if applicable. Students should consult with their thesis committee chair before making any changes to their approved proposal or research project.

Defending a Thesis

Graduate students must defend their thesis in a public forum. Before scheduling a defense, students must have a current thesis uploaded in ProQuest. Although the thesis does not have to be fully formatted, it should contain all of the required thesis chapters. The thesis must comply with the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and the Graduate School's thesis policies, which are available on the Graduate School's Academics (Thesis Assistance) website. Student must complete and submit the RIGHT TO DEFEND FORM, which is available on the Graduate School's Academics (Forms) website. The completed Defend Form should be submitted to the Graduate School. The Graduate School will review the thesis in ProQuest. If the thesis is acceptable, the Graduate School will notify students by email that they may schedule their thesis defense. If the Graduate Programs Office is not copied on this email, students must forward the Graduate School's email to the Graduate Programs Office. The Right to Defend email must be on file in the Graduate Programs Office before students can schedule their thesis defense.

The thesis should be defended at a time that is mutually agreeable to the student, thesis committee, and reader. The thesis must be defended between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, while classes are in session (i.e., excluding University holidays, final exams week, or semester breaks). When an acceptable time has been determined, students should contact the Graduate Programs Office to reserve a room. The Graduate Programs Office will notify the student when a room has been reserved.

At least one week before the scheduled defense, students must submit to the Graduate Programs Office by 12:00 p.m. (Noon) a printed copy of the thesis. Students must also provide a copy of the thesis to their thesis committee and reader; the copy may be printed or sent electronically, depending on the preferences of the committee members and reader. The Graduate Programs Office will announce the scheduled defense to the department's graduate students and faculty members. The thesis defense will also be posted on the University Events website and on the bulletin board across from the department's office. Students must also complete the Graduate School's OUTCOME OF DEFENSE FORM, which is available on the Graduate School's Academics (Forms) website. Students should take the Outcome of Defense Form to their thesis defense.

The department encourages psychology graduate students to attend a thesis defense in order to observe the process. The defense is also open to the University academic community. Students should consult with their thesis committee chair if students would like to invite non-academic parties (i.e., family and friends) to their defense. Individuals observing the defense may ask the student questions and provide comments about the presentation. However, participation by such individuals should not monopolize the presentation. Since the defense is a formal evaluation of the student, the thesis committee chair has the discretion of whether or not to recognize individuals for questions or comments during the presentation. The department prohibits any refreshments at a thesis defense.

At the defense, students should discuss the importance of the thesis topic, their research and the methods employed, analysis of the data, and their conclusion. When the defense has ended and there are no more questions, everyone should leave the room except for the thesis committee, reader, and any other psychology faculty members. The committee will discuss the quality of the thesis and defense, taking into account the consistency between the thesis proposal and defense, and the incorporation of required changes identified at the thesis proposal, if applicable. Psychology faculty who have an opinion about the thesis are encouraged to present their remarks for consideration by the thesis committee. The decision to approve or withhold approval of the thesis defense is the responsibility of the committee. The committee must reach a consensus about the status of the defense. When a consensus has been reached, the student will be asked to return to the room and will be informed of the committee's decision.

The thesis committee can reach one of three decisions about the thesis: approved, a provisional approval with required changes, or not approved. If the committee approves the thesis, the committee members should sign the Outcome of Defense Form. If the decision is a provisional approval, the committee should discuss the changes required in the thesis with the student. The committee chair should provide the student with a written list of the required changes. Students are responsible for incorporating the changes before the thesis committee will approve the thesis. After the changes have been made and the thesis is approved, the thesis committee should sign the Outcome of Defense Form. Students must submit a copy of the signed Outcome of Defense Form to the Graduate Programs Office. If the thesis is not approved, the student should discuss any viable options with the thesis committee.

Students must upload the approved thesis to ProQuest. Students must also complete the FINAL DEPOSIT CHECKLIST, which is available on the Graduate School's  Academics (Forms) website.  Students must submit the signed Outcome of Defense Form and the Final Deposit Checklist, and any copyright permissions, if applicable, to the Graduate School. The Graduate School will examine the thesis in ProQuest to determine if the thesis complies with the University's thesis policies. If the Graduate School notifies students of required changes, those changes must be made and the revised thesis must be uploaded to ProQuest before the University will accept the thesis as meeting degree requirements for graduation. If the required changes are not completed before the thesis final deposit filing deadline, graduation will be postponed until the following semester.

Publication of Data

If the thesis is published or if a paper is presented at a professional convention, authorship should follow the provisions of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. An agreement between students and their thesis committee should govern whether committee members are identified as co-authors.